Rochelle Bilal: “Beaty Can Win!”

History-Making Philadelphia Sheriff to Campaign Here for Kim Beaty

Then Sheriff Rochelle Bilal was sworn in to serve a four-year term to lead the Office of the Sheriff for the City and County of Philadelphia last January, she made history as the first elected African American woman sheriff  in the department’s 181-year history, as well as its first-ever elected woman.

 Sheriff Bilal  is coming to town in two weeks to attend an important fundraiser in support  of Kimberly Beaty  who is  running for   Sheriff of Erie County  – a candidate she believes can win.  The event, hosted by Michael “Mickey” Vertino, Lisa Wilson, Bernard “Bernie” Tolbert and Friends,  will take place on Wednesday, June 2 at the Luxor Steak & Lobster Restaurant, 3199 Main Street from 6-8 p.m. Tickets are $250 for Sponsors, $99 for  Supporters and $50 for Contributors.

For ticket information click here to go to the website   for the link to email  info@kimberlybeatyforsheriff.com or call (716) 602-4438.

The careers of Bilal and Beaty parallel in a number of ways. 

•Aside from both  being intelligent, qualified, experienced women of color, they are both former city police officers; Bilal, a 27-year veteran of the Philadelphia Police Department and Beaty who served for 32 years in The Buffalo Police Department, rising to the rank of Deputy Police commissioner.

•Sheriff Bilal is an historic first. Officer Beaty, currently serving as the Director of Public Safety   at Canisius College is hailed as the first woman to hold this post at the college. Sheriff Bilal also worked in Public Safety. In the capacity of a “first.”

•They were both born and raised in the cities/communities  they serve.   

•As an officer Bilal taught recruits at the Philadelphia Police Training Center, where she launched the Steer Straight initiative. Steer Straight, which is still in existence today, helps new police recruits to identify and avoid situations that may pose potential risks to their future careers in law enforcement. 

•Chief Beaty is a Certified Master Instructor for the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services and has provided training at several police agencies across the region. She serves as a facilitator for the Erie County Law Enforcement Training Academy, focusing on   Law Enforcement and Diversity.  

•And most significantly Sheriff Bilal, like candidate  Beaty, ran without the support of the  local Democratic Party in her town. Her campaign reportedly brought together people from all walks of life across the city. At one point during the election   Bilal declared, “There has to be change. We’re sick of bullies in the Democratic Party. I will not be bullied. Trust me: we are going to win this race because of that.” She campaigned on a fresh start to a troubled office   and  despite the naysayers, won  an upset  Democratic Primary victory over a 2-term sheriff.

She was sworn in on January 6, 2020.

 It’s expected that remarks from  Sheriff Bilal will further energize the Beaty base as  we get closer to the June 22 Primary.

-An Advocate for Criminal Justice Reform

Sheriff Bilal formerly served as secretary of the Philadelphia chapter of the NAACP. She is president of the Guardian Civic League, a law enforcement community oversight organization, made up of over 2,500 active and retired Philadelphia police officers.

As a Philadelphia police officer, Sheriff Bilal served in units that focused on sex crimes and drug trafficking. She also spent time in patrol, and taught recruits at the Philadelphia Police Training Center, where she launched the Steer Straight initiative. Steer Straight, which is still in existence today, helps new police recruits to identify and avoid situations that may pose potential risks to their future careers in law enforcement. Bilal retired from the Philadelphia Police Department in 2013.

 Sheriff Bilal is an advocate of criminal justice reform and encourages community engagement and outreach with her office. As sheriff, she implements policies and procedures to improve the efficiency and engagement of the more than 400 employees of the department. The Sheriff’s Office has a $26 million + budget and oversees court security, prisoner transportation to and from court, as well as managing sheriff’s sales, court-ordered sales of foreclosed and tax-delinquent properties.

Sheriff Bilal is a lifelong resident of Philadelphia.