Surviving COVID-19:  Tips for Older Adults

The CDC says “older adults” and people with severe chronic illness are more likely to become severely ill from COVID-19.

To safeguard seniors  from COVID-19, experts at the CDC are now recommending stronger precautions for those ages 60 and older.

They should watch for these early warning signs that something may be wrong.

COVID-19 symptoms include fever, cough and shortness of breath. Call your doctor if you start to develop any of these symptoms.

•Seek emergency help immediately if you:

•Have difficulty breathing or shortness of breath.

•Persistent pain or pressure in the chest.

•New confusion or difficulty waking up.

•Bluish lips or face.

This list is not all-inclusive. Consult a medical provider with any severe or concerning symptoms.

“Older adults may be less likely than younger individuals to run a fever when they have an infection say experts.                 If you have other symptoms of an infection or are feeling poorly, it is better to get checked out even if you don’t have a fever.

Should SENIORS avoid senior centers, churches and other areas where there may be large numbers of compromised people, including cruise ships and airplanes?

People who are at higher risk of getting seriously ill from COVID-19 should take everyday precautions to keep space between themselves and others and should avoid crowds as much as possible, according to guidance from the CDC.

And if a COVID-19 outbreak comes to your community, staying home as much as possible is wise.

If you to go out into the public, keep away from others who are sick, limit close contact and wash your hands often.

Take these precautions to stay well and prevent the spread of coronavirus:

Wash your hands frequently with soap and water. Wash for at least 20 seconds before you eat, after you sneeze and after using the bathroom.

Wash your hands frequently with soap and water. Wash for at least 20 seconds before you eat, after you sneeze and after using the bathroom.