A BRIEF HISTORY ON JUNETEENTH

Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of the enslavement of Africans in the United States.  Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that Blacks were now free. This  was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation – which had become official January 1, 1863. The Emancipation Proclamation had little impact on the Texans due to the minimal number of Union troops to enforce the new Executive Order. However, with the surrender of General Lee in April of 1865, and the arrival of General Granger’s regiment, the forces were finally strong enough to influence and overcome the resistance.

     General Order Number 3

One of General Granger’s first orders of business was to read to the people of Texas, General Order Number 3 which began most significantly with:

The people of Texas are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and free laborer.”

The reactions to this profound news ranged from pure shock to immediate jubilation.          The celebration of June 19th was coined “Juneteenth” and grew with more participation from descendants.

2019 marks the 154th anniversary of the first Juneteenth celebration as well as Buffalo’s 44th consecutive year of celebrating this historic event. Juneteenth is a celebration of Freedom, Heritage and Humanity.